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Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Description For God's Perpetual Motion See Saw

God's Perpetual Motion Seesaw
Medium/Inventor: Don Jyovi
Patent Pending
Applied for August 22, 1996

All the drawings of this description were meticulously done by my nephew, Mike Tattner, on Autocad...Thanx Mike! miketattner@gmail.com






Summary of the Invention
The Perpetual Motion Seesaw is kept in a state of constant imbalance by shifting weights close to and then far away from the fulcrum. This imbalance then causes the up and down motion of the seesaw, and this motion is then converted to circular motion for the purpose of generating electricity. Viewing the animation will give one a clearer idea of this invention.
Description of the Perpetual Motion Seesaw


Figures 1 & 2 of 11 (Front and top views of entire machine)
The seesaw (#1) is connected to it's stand (#2) at the fulcrum with an axle (#3). At both ends of the seesaw, are the weights (#12), which are shifted close to and then far away from the fulcrum, through the use of a weight shifter assembly (#13). This shifter assembly travels p and down along with the seesaw and yet maintains a horizontal status as it does so, with the use of roller bearing assemblies (#14) that glide along on vertical (#9) and horizontal (#10) guide rails.
The weights move along this shifter, on the one end of the seesaw, close to the fulcrum, and on the other end, far away from the fulcrum. The weights are allowed to bear their weight directly onto the seesaw's extending curved roller shafts (#8) and this causes the seesaw to move up, and then, after the weights shift again, the seesaw moves down. This is done continually.
Then, this up and down motion of the seesaw is converted to circular motion with the use of two flywheels with pulleys (#4) that are connected to the axle of the seesaw. This circular motion is then transferred down to the electrical generator shaft (#6) using a round polymer belt (#5).











Figure 3 & 4 of 11 (Front and top view close-up of roller assembly with guide rail)
The diamond shaped roller assembly (#14) is connected to the vertical guide rail (#9) and the horizontal guide rail (#10) with the use of roller bearings (#15) that are positioned on the diamond shaped panel (#17) of the roller bearing assembly in such a way as to permit the weight shifter assemblies at each end of the seesaw to travel both up and down with the seesaw and close to and then far away from the fulcrum of the seesaw in an arc shaped pattern, all the while, maintaining the weight shifters in a horizontal position.











 seesaw's movement.
A trip mechanism retaining rail (#35) keeps the trip mechanism arm in position against the weight until seesaw reaches top or bottom and then releases it, which in turn, lets loose the weight, to travel to the other end of the already shifted weight shifter pipes.

Figure 5 of 11 (Close-up of roller bearings of roller assembly)
The pipe that is used for guide rails (#9 & #10) and shown as number nineteen in this drawing, glides through the roller bearing housing (#16) that consists of twelve roller bearings (#18) arranged in such a way, as to always be in contact with the guide rail pipes.


Figure 6 of 11 (Top view close-up of weight shifter assembly)
This assembly is connected to the horizontal guide rail beneath it. The weight (#12) travels along between the two weight shifter pipes (#22) and seeks the widest point between the two pipes where it meets up against the seesaw's extending curved roller shaft (#8) and then bears part of its weight at that point. The weight shifter pipes swivel on pivots (#23) and have stabilizing roller wheels (#24) that roll along the weight shifter platform (#21). The pipes also extend into the weight shifter guide panels (#11), and with the use of rotating shafts at the point where the pipes are in contact with the guide panels, they roll along the contours of the guide panels. This, in turn, causes the pipes to swivel, making one end narrow as the other end widens. So, it is in this manner, that the weights are shifted to go where they are needed. At the position, where the weights meet the roller shafts, that is, at the two extreme ends of the weight shifter pipes, are rotating shafts (#25) built into the pipes, that facilitate the widening and narrowing of the gaps between the two pipes. Another feature that helps facilitate the widening and narrowing of the gaps, is a spring loaded arm, (#41), that has just enough tension, to allow the weight on it when the gap is wide, but when the gap begins to narrow, the tension serves to lift the weight up along with the roller shafts, this makes for an effortless shifting of the pipes.
It is also at these two extremities, that the weights meet the seesaw's extending curved roller shafts (#8), thus allowing a part of their weight to transfer down to the seesaw (#1), thereby causing the seesaw to move.
A weight retaining trip mechanism (#34), that applies spring tension (#36 of figure #9) on the weight to press against the seesaw's extending curved roller shafts, is used to keep the weights at the extreme end of the weight shifter, even as the weight shifter pipes have already begun shifting, so that, by the time, the seesaw has fully reached top or bottom, the trip mechanisms activated, thereby releasing the weight, to roll along the already fully shifted weight shifter pipes. As a result, the weights shift with more momentum, and, beforehand, we could afford to shift the weight shifter pipes very gradually, so as to not take any momentum away from the




Figure 7 of 11 (Front view of weight shifter guide panels)
The weight shifter pipes extend into this panel assembly, and roll along the contours of the guide panels. The top panel (#26) widens the gap between the weight shifter pipes at that end (outer) and narrows the gap at the opposite end (inner, near the fulcrum), so that when the seesaw reaches the top, the weight, seeking the widest gap, comes to be at the point furthest away from the fulcrum, bearing part of its weight on the seesaw's outer extending curved roller shaft (#8). Meanwhile, at the other end of the seesaw, where the weight shifter assembly is reaching bottom, the weight shifter pipes roll along the bottom guide panels (#27) and narrow the weight shifter pipes at that end (outer), while widening the weight shifter pipes at the other end (inner, near the fulcrum). So that, the weight, seeking the widest gap, comes to be at the point nearest to the fulcrum, and here bears part of it's weight on the seesaw's inner extending curved roller shaft (#8).
This causes an imbalance on the seesaw, and so the up side end goes down, and the down side end goes up. As this occurs, the weight shifter pipes, following the contours of the guide panels, reverse the whole situation, causing the narrow to get wide, and the wide to get narrow. This, in turn, shifts the weights once again, and in so doing, causes an imbalance on the seesaw again. This cycle repeats itself over and over again perpetually.



Figure 8 of 11 (Close-up of seesaw's extending curved roller shaft)

 This has recently been modified to a better method...using springloaded arms for better efficiency...the following description still applies to this new method just the same....the animation illustrates this new method...link to animation coming soon...

The weights are allowed to bear on these extending curved roller shafts, and thereby, transfer a part of their weight down to the seesaw.
On the outer shaft (#8), that is, the one further from the seesaw's fulcrum, part of the weight is transferred down to the point where the shaft is connected to the seesaw, and the remainder of the weight continues to bear on the weight shifter assembly and transfers down to the point where the weight shifter assembly is connected to the seesaw (at the weight shifter axle - #31 of figures 1 & 2). Somewhere between these two points on the seesaw, is where the center of balance is for this weight (#33 of figure #1).
Meanwhile, on the inner shaft, at the opposite end of the seesaw, the weight, bears a part of its weight here, and this transfers down to where the inner shaft is connected to the seesaw (at the fulcrum) and the remaining part continues to bear on the weight shifter assembly and transfers down to the weight shifter assembly axle at the seesaw. And so, somewhere between these two points on the seesaw, is where the center of balance is, for this weight (#32 of figure #1).
So, on the one end of the seesaw, we have the center of balance three quarters of the way out from the fulcrum (the halfway point between the weight shifter axle and the outer extending curved shaft connecting point).
And on the other end, we have the center of balance one quarter of the way out from the fulcrum (the halfway point between the weight shifter axle and the inner extending curved shaft connecting point).
The different centers of balance on either end of the seesaw cause an imbalance of the seesaw and this is why we achieve motion.








Figure 9 of 11 (Top view close-up of weight retaining trip mechanism)
This mechanism (#34) has three arms, and is connected to the weight shifter platform beneath it by a swivel (#37). It is located in such a way that, as the weight rolls toward that end of the weight shifter assembly, one of the arms (#38 the trip arm) is tripped by the weight and swivels out of the way in the direction of the weight. Another arm (#39 the spring tension arm) swoops in behind the weight, and using spring tension (#36), maintains light pressure against the weight to press against the extending curved roller shaft (#8). This arm also has rollers that contact on the weight. The third arm (#40 the retainer rail arm) catches onto a trip mechanism retainer rail (#35), and, uses rollers (#25) that roll along this rail and this is how the aforementioned arm (#39) is able to maintain tension on the weight. This arm (#40) is released once seesaw reaches full top or bottom, thereby allowing the weight to roll the spring tension arm (#39) out of the way, and continue along the already fully shifted weight shifter pipes, to the now wider gap at the other end of the weight shifter assembly. There is a trip mechanism (#34) and a retainer rail (#35) at each end of the weight shifter assembly.

 Claims of the Perpetual Motion Seesaw
This machine can be built any size, and can be made to be part of a larger apparatus, where there are many such machines in a row, supplying motion to a common electrical generator shaft.
We will have free and unlimited electricity with no pollution. Absolutely anywhere that it may be needed. There will no longer be a need for long distance transmission wires. Nor will there be a need for nuclear power.
Thank you.
Don Jyovi



Figure 10 of 11 (Top view close-up of flywheel pulley)
The seesaw (#1) moves up and down, causing the axle (#3) that is joined to the seesaw, to turn both clockwise and counter-clockwise (#20). Through the use of ratchet bearings (or clutch bearings) (#28) that permit only one way motion, we have one flywheel (#4) , that catches the clockwise motion, and the other flywheel catches the counter-clockwise motion. The heavy flywheels continue to rotate from their own weight as they receive continuous short nudges from the seesaw axle.
The clockwise flywheel is directly connected to the electrical generator shaft (which also turns clockwise). A round polymer belt is used between the two pulleys and the electrical generator shaft pulley is much smaller than the flywheel pulley, thus we get an increase in RPM.


Figure 11 of 11 (Front view close-up of the counter-clockwise to clockwise motion converter)
The counter-clockwise flywheel pulley (#4) is connected to a twin pulley assembly (#29) that converts the counter-clockwise motion to clockwise motion and then transfers down to the electrical generator shaft (#6) along with the other flywheel. Thus both flywheels power the same generator shaft.
copyright 2000